Moun’s parents seem to see no future for their country, which is in the grip of the madness of war. In an act of desperation, they decide to yield up their only daughter to the sea in the hope that she will have a chance of salvation far from the war. Moun crosses the ocean in a bamboo box and ends up “beyond” the sea, where another couple finds her on a beach, takes her to safety and adopts her. Moun grows up in a family that loves her, surrounded by brothers and sisters. But the day comes when she learns about her true origins and she finds herself having to come to terms with her own past…

Although the story of “Moun” deals with difficult issues such as abandonment, adoption, homesickness and creating self-identity, it nonetheless conveys a sense of great serenity. Its strength lies in the contrast between the seriousness of the topics it deals with and the great light-heartedness with which they are expressed. This poetic lightness is conveyed on stage by the water-coloured, pastel-toned shadow-images and the calm and relaxed rhythms that create an atmosphere of peace that pervades both the action on stage and the narration.